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Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen podcast to be repackaged and sold as $50 book
AP

Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen podcast to be repackaged and sold as $50 book

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President Barack Obama presents presents musician Bruce Springsteen with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, during a ceremony on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016, honoring 21 recipients in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C..

President Barack Obama presents presents musician Bruce Springsteen with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, during a ceremony on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016, honoring 21 recipients in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS)

The Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen brotherhood of man mission continues.

“Renegades,” the podcast collaboration between the former president and the Boss has been repurposed and will be released as a book this fall.

“Renegades: Born in the USA,” the book adaptation, will be released Oct. 26, Penguin Random House announced on Thursday.

The 320-page tome will retail for $50 and include introductions by Obama and Springsteen, more than 350 photos and illustrations, and archival material such as the Rock & Roll Hall of Famer’s handwritten lyrics and Obama’s annotated speeches.

“Over the years, what we’ve found is that we’ve got a shared sensibility,” Obama wrote in the book’s introduction. “About work, about family, and about America. In our own ways, Bruce and I have been on parallel journeys trying to understand this country that’s given us both so much. Trying to chronicle the stories of its people. Looking for a way to connect our own individual searches for meaning and truth and community with the larger story of America.”

Springsteen wrote, “There were serious conversations about the fate of the country, the fortune of its citizens, and the destructive, ugly, corrupt forces at play that would like to take it all down. This is a time of vigilance when who we are is being seriously tested. Hard conversations about who we are and who we want to become can perhaps serve as a small guiding map for some of our fellow citizens.

“This is a time for serious consideration of who we want to be and what kind of country we will leave our children,” Obama continued. “Will we let slip through our hands the best of us or will we turn united to face the fire? Within this book you won’t find the answers to those questions, but you will find a couple of seekers doing their best to get us to ask better questions.”

The digital edition of “Renegades” will be priced at $17.99 in the United States and $21.99 in Canada.

A Spanish-language edition will also be available.

Initially launched in February, the eight-part series was comprised of frank conversations about race, role models, fatherhood, social justice and a vision of how we can all move forward together.

Sponsored by Dollar Shave Club and Comcast, “Renegades,” has become the most-listened-to podcast around the world on Spotify.

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