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  • After a full week of incredible golf, celebration and patriotism at Des Moines Golf and Country Club, the official attendance for the 2017 Solheim Cup has been tallied. The global golf event attracted 124,426 over its three day run this past weekend.

This number surpasses the last attendance record for the Solheim Cup, set in 2009 at Rich Harvest Farms in Illinois. Additionally, the large crowds on Friday broke the event’s single-day attendance record.

“Watching the crowds stream into Des Moines Golf and Country Club was a thrill,” said Chris Garrett, Tournament Director. “Running the Solheim Cup was a dream realized for me. Knowing we were able to bring in record crowds and create more fans of golf, the LPGA and the Solheim Cup make the success of the event even sweeter.”

The record-breaking crowd was comprised of thousands of ticket holders from around the globe. More than 50 percent of attendees came from outside of the state of Iowa including fans from more than 25 countries. Those patriotic fans were big spenders, too. Fans purchased more than $2 million in merchandise – breaking yet another event record.



  • Anquan Boldin didn't decide overnight he was going to quit football in order to speak out against longstanding concerns over inequality in America.

The recent deadly and racially charged conflict in Charlottesville, Virginia, did, however, become the tipping point that caused Boldin to reassess his priorities and led to the Buffalo Bills receiver's decision to retire after 14 NFL seasons.

"I think anybody with any sense can see how divided we are as a country, and Charlottesville only magnified what we were already seeing," Boldin told The Associated Press by phone Monday.

He was disturbed by the hateful messages directed at African-Americans, Jewish people and the LGBT community during a rally involving neo-Nazis and other right-wing groups in which a counter-protester was killed and two Virginia state police officers died on Aug. 13.

"That's not the America that I want to live in," he said. "And I think the only way that this America changes is that we as a people stand up and change it."

Boldin spoke a day after abruptly informing the Bills he was retiring some two weeks after signing a one-year contract with a base salary of $1.75 million.

The NFL's 2015 Walter Payton Man of the Year, Boldin is no stranger to activism and humanitarian causes. He oversees the South Florida-based Q81 Foundation, which offers educational support for underprivileged children.

  • Commissioner Roger Goodell is on track to maintain his prominent place at the table for the next round of collective bargaining between NFL owners and players, a process that's sure to be contentious.

The league is working on a five-year contract extension for Goodell, a person with knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity Monday because the deal is not complete. Sports Business Journal first reported the contract negotiations.

Goodell's contract is up after the 2019 season. The new deal would cover the 2024 season. That's a clear signal of the trust the owners have in Goodell to help steer the league through another labor agreement, since the current collective bargaining agreement expires after the 2020 season.

Goodell became commissioner in 2006. He earned just over $31 million for the 2015 season, down from about $34 million in 2014. Because the league office is no longer classified as a tax-exempt organization , the commissioner's salary is no longer required to be made public through tax filings.

  • A man who shot and wounded a judge outside a county courthouse before being gunned down by a probation officer was the father of a high school football player who was convicted of rape in 2013, authorities said Monday.

Jefferson County Judge Joseph Bruzzese Jr. was shot Monday morning near the courthouse in Steubenville, across the Ohio River from West Virginia's northern panhandle and just west of Pittsburgh.

Authorities identified the gunman as Nathaniel "Nate" Richmond, the father of Ma'Lik Richmond. Ma'Lik, then 17, served about 10 months in a juvenile lockup after being convicted with another Steubenville High School football player of raping a 16-year-old girl during an alcohol-fueled party in 2012.

The case brought international attention to the eastern Ohio city of 18,000 residents and led to allegations of a cover-up to protect the football team.

Investigators are looking for a motive in the shooting and haven't found a connection to the rape case, prosecutor Jane Hanlin said.

A visiting judge from Hamilton County, where Cincinnati is located, handled the majority of the rape case.



Sports Reporter

Sports reporter for The Courier

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