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The National Wrestling Hall of Fame Iowa Chapter has announced that Cornell College head coach Mike Duroe will be presented with the Lifetime Service to Wrestling Award during the Iowa-Oklahoma State dual on Sunday at Carver-Hawkeye Arena.

Duroe, Cornell’s all-time winningest coach, will receive the award from National Wrestling Hall of Fame Distinguished Member Dan Gable and Hall of Fame Executive Director Lee Roy Smith.

The award recognizes Duroe’s 38 years of coaching and impacting wrestling at all levels. The presentation will happen after the second match of the meet.

Sunday’s dual starts at 3 p.m. and will be televised by the Big Ten Network.

Former Northern Iowa wrestler Mark Rial was recently announced as co-head coach for the United States Greco-Roman Cadet team that will be competing this July in Zagreb, Croatia.

Rial wrestled at UNI from 1999-2001.


Iowa State signee Ashley Joens was named to the Naismith Trophy High School watch list, which honors the nation’s top high school player.

Joens, who plays at Iowa City High, is one of just 25 athletes in the country to make the mid-season list. Joens is averaging 28.8 points and 11.1 rebounds per game. and is ranked as the No. 19 overall prospect in the Class of 2018 by ESPN’s Hoop Gurlz.


The NFL said Thursday it will investigate whether the Oakland Raiders violated the “Rooney Rule” when they hired Jon Gruden as coach.

The Fritz Pollard Alliance called for the investigation on Wednesday out of concern that Raiders owner Mark Davis came to an agreement with Gruden before the team interviewed any minority candidates as required by the NFL since 2003.

NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said in a statement that the NFL will “look into this.”

The Fritz Pollard Alliance is dedicated to promoting diversity and equality of job opportunity in the coaching, front office and scouting staffs of NFL teams.

Davis said Tuesday at the news conference introducing Gruden as the team’s new coach that he had been trying to make the move for six years and finally believed it would happen after a meeting in Philadelphia on Christmas Eve, the day before Gruden worked a game between the Raiders and Eagles on ESPN.

Former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez’s life and death will be the subject of a one-hour special episode of “48 Hours” to be broadcast on Jan. 20.

The CBS program will be told by best-selling author James Patterson, who is writing a book about Hernandez.

Once one of the top players in the NFL, Hernandez was convicted for the murder of Odin Lloyd, who was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancée. Hernandez hanged himself at the age of 27 in the Massachusetts prison cell where he was serving a life sentence. After his death, he was diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which can cause depression and violent mood swings.

Patterson calls it “the most fascinating, complicated and troubling crime story of our times.”

The book “All-American Murder” is due out Jan. 22.

The NFL is heading to a new destination in London, and the first match-up at English Premier League club Tottenham will be the Oakland Raiders against the Seattle Seahawks in October.

That’s if the 60,000-plus capacity stadium, which has been designed to accommodate soccer and NFL, is completed in time for Week 6.

While Tottenham is sure that building work is on schedule on the White Hart Lane site where its previous stadium was demolished last year, the NFL has contingency plans to move the Oct. 14 game to Wembley Stadium.

The home of the England national soccer team is where the NFL will be staging another two games after Raiders-Seahawks match-up, giving London three consecutive weeks of American football for the first time.

The Philadelphia Eagles will play the Jacksonville Jaguars, and the Tennessee Titans will take on the Los Angeles Chargers. The NFL is yet to decide which game will be on Oct. 21 in Week 7 and which slots into Week 8 on Oct. 28.


The U.S. Army has filed a challenge opposing the application of the NHL’s newest franchise to register the trademark “Vegas Golden Knights.”

In a claim filed Wednesday with the U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board in suburban Washington, the Army claims it will be damaged if the trademark is registered and says it has acquired exclusive rights to it that predate any rights claimed by the NHL team.

The Army says it has used the Golden Knights nickname since the late 1960s for its parachute team, public relations and recruiting, and claims it owns “common law rights” for the color schemes that combine black and gold and yellow and white.

The challenge by the U.S. Army was first reported by

The filing also says the NHL team’s choice of black-and-gold and yellow-and-white color schemes for its uniforms, advertising and marketing adds “to the likelihood of confusion of the public” because the same colors are used on the uniforms worn by West Point’s hockey team and the paint scheme on the building where they play their home games, Tate Rink.

The action by the Army is not associated with West Point. Vegas owner Bill Foley is a graduate of academy and a significant donor.


Sports Reporter

Sports reporter for The Courier

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